Adjective Lesson Plans

If you're writing adjective lesson plans for older students, you'll want age-appropriate activities. These grammar activities are easy to personalize and will support your grammar lessons. #MiddleSchoolELA #HighSchoolELA

Adjective lesson plans are here!Β 

If you’re writing adjective lesson plans for older students, you’ll want age-appropriate activities. These grammar activities are easy to personalize and will support your grammar lessons.

For instance, a primary teacher (a friend of mine) said she asks students to get out their white boards and write adjectives that describe her. The students take turns flipping their boards over to surprise her. That sounds so sweet, and I can picture her third graders thinking of adjectives like “nice” and “pretty” to flatter their teacher.

But you know. . . I’m not risking that activity with tweens and teens. Over the years, I’ve developed adjective activities for older students.

If you’re introducing the parts of speech, reviewing adjectives before working with coordinate adjectives, or sorting out adjective and adverb confusion, you can use these adjective lesson plans.

If you're writing adjective lesson plans for older students, you'll want age-appropriate activities. These grammar activities are easy to personalize and will support your grammar lessons. #MiddleSchoolELA #HighSchoolELA

Basic approach

Sometimes, older students simply need a quick adjective review. I’ve had classes that need a fast (like five minutes!) of discussion concerning adjectives. Before teaching the rules of coordinate adjectives, we will quickly find adjectives from a worksheet. If students struggle with adjectives and adverbs in writing or vocabulary lessons, we will work on the task cards for a lengthier discussion. We might review adjectives with all parts of speech.

So! Decide what detail your students need. Older students can identify adjectives most of the time. I don’t always jump in with a full lesson, but if they are simply not grasping adjectives, I expand my lessons.

Sticky note review

If you read my post about teaching nouns, you know that I ask students to label nouns in my room. Typically, I provide plain yellow sticky notes for the nouns. Students identify nouns, and I leave the sticky notes as reminders. Then, when students work on adjectives, I distribute colorful sticky notes for colorful adjectives. Students label those nouns with adjectives.

As an extension activity, grab the noun and adjective sticky notes and turn them into sentences. It’s a great opportunity to practice power verbs and review punctuation.

Adjective one-pager

Students understand language when they play with it and when they see it in areas outside of a worksheet. Ask students to find adjectives in what they are reading. You can find adjectives in book spine poetry, for example. When you cover characterization with a particular character, ask students to identify the adjectives the author used.

I pull books from my classroom library and let students sort through them, hunting for adjectives in the titles. Not only are students searching for adjectives, but they are also interacting with books. For students who enjoy a language arts class because of the language aspect, this is a nice opportunity for connecting books to their interest. I have students complete a one-pager to visualize the adjectives.

The one-pager also allows me to sneak in creative writing. Students can imagine the first page of a book, of course using adjectives.

Adjective station work

After a class abides by procedures and routines, I begin grammar stations with them. Students work together and move. Plus, if it feels like a class is on the verge of grasping adjectives, I get real-time feedback.

I do have my adjective station work incredibly organized, and that allows me to add task cards or extra practice to the rotations. Not all of station work needs to be graded, either! Many times, I ask students to take a picture of their best station for credit.

When teaching adjectives with older students, think about what will move them to mastery. Sometimes, you won’t need to spend multiple class periods working with adjectives. Adjective worksheets can provide direct instruction and a quick review. If your students need in-depth practice with adjectives, add a one-pager, station work, or task cards to your adjective lesson plans. Once we engage students with adjectives and provide multiple opportunities to interact with them, we will have successful adjective lesson plans.

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