5 Things Teachers Do All Summer

5 Things Teachers Do All Summer


Things teachers do all summer? It’s probably unromantic. 

Spring break is over, and the countdowns are on for the end of the school year. This can only mean one thing; people will start asking me what teachers do all summer.

What do teachers DO all summer? I can’t speak for every teacher everywhere, but here is what I do after a year of teaching.

What do teachers do all summer? The unromantic truth.

  1. I organize myself and my house. Personally, I sleep (lots). I enjoy not setting an alarm. I drink coffee in pajamas. I stare out the window.
    I clean my house. Closets. Kid clothes. Match pairs of gloves. Take loads to Goodwill. Pretty boring activities.
  2. I spend time with my kids and husband. Puzzles, books, tv. I run the kids to summer camp. We take a vacation (normally). I take my kids to swim, to the park, to the library. I read.
    This is normally June-ish. I’m under the (incorrect) illusion that summer is stretching long before me.
  3. I tiptoe into the world of education. This happens in July because I’ve realized that August is next. Also, back to school commercials crop up.I unload my school bag. I start searching ideas on Pinterest. I read a few short stories/ novels/ nonfiction pieces for work.
  4. I create a vision for my next year.This includes both personal and school life. A goal that I always renew is not to eat out during the school year. I want to prep meals, have frozen meals on hand, and eat healthier than I did the year before. I might stock my deep freezer.More than anything, I decide what I want for the next school year. This includes organization for myself and students, curriculum, implementing changes, and classroom setup.
  5. I start working. Before my unpaid vacation is over*, I start working.I create lesson plans, research ideas, collaborate with coworkers, and begin changes in my classroom.

Am I grateful to be a teacher? Do I enjoy teaching? Do I believe this is the most important job in the world? Yes.

That is why my brain never really turns off from teaching. My 5 things teachers do all summer are probably reflective of teachers across the states. Boring, maybe, but necessary.

* Teachers aren’t paid for the summer months where I live. Our pay is based on nine months of work, but some schools kindly divide the nine months of pay over twelve months.

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